Why Richmond (Madison Co.), Kentucky?

Why am I adding a location to see clients in Richmond, KY? Madison County is my home and I see families struggle to reach their lactation goals. It’s such a blessing to be able to expand lactation services in the area I live in!

Fortunately, Lactation Care with Elizabeth cares about families, even those of our consultants and staff. Not only is it more convenient for myself and my family, but it helps bring expert lactation support to families in an area that has previously had next to nothing.

Access to lactation support, particularly to expert IBCLC care, is a big platform for me. An important first step is having a space available to reach those families outside Lexington, to make access to care easier and closer. Having someone in the community easily accessible will help facilitate meeting breastfeeding goals as well as ease some of their burdens.  

Getting help early is so crucial for overall supply, bonding, and goals.  Please don’t wait!  

I will have office hours available in Richmond and Lexington each week.  I can’t wait to help support your family.  

Follow us on Facebook or Instagram at Lactation Care with Elizabeth and Ashley Kester RN, MSN, IBCLC. 

Thanks,

Ashley Kester RN, MSN, IBCLC

Real Client, Real Experience

Received from a current client as of January 2022:

I’ve been so thrilled with my experience 
with Elizabeth (and Katie) I would be glad to sing their praises any time!

Going in, I thought a lactation consultant would just show you how to 
hold the baby properly and ensure a good latch, I didn’t know enough to 
even realize there could be more to learn.
We’ve gotten so much more 
than that; Elizabeth has been so compassionate and encouraging; in 
talking over our problems, we always feel she’s part therapist for us, lol.

We didn’t realize that appointments would include before and after weigh 
ins for the baby, which has been such a reassurance.
When breastfeeding, 
it’s kind of hair raising to not know how much food your baby is 
actually getting. Having that info was such a relief.

Having someone inspect his mouth, gauge the strength of his suck, and 
tongue action, etc, was something I didn’t realize could even be 
examined
, and knowing that he doesn’t have any problems in those 
departments was also a relief; I’d say the same if she DID find 
problems, knowing is half the battle, after all.

She’s helped put to bed many of our anxieties about handwashing, green 
diapers, spit up, and some medical misconceptions (I had been worried 
that letting him comfort nurse would stimulate my body to keep producing 
more milk, but she explained that it’s a different sucking pattern and 
my body knows to ignore that in terms of milk production). Elizabeth has 
also given my husband pointers for bottle feeding, and advice on different 
nipple styles, and even a new nipple to test drive at home. In my mind, 
I thought a lactation consultant would cover breastfeeding alone; if we 
had gone with formula or exclusive bottle feeding of breastmilk, we 
never would have even thought about seeking out a lactation consultant. 
I imagine there are others like that too, who think this type of service 
is for the breast-fed baby alone.

Sometimes just watching how Elizabeth handles the baby has been so 
helpful too. Perhaps like many first time parents, we’ve been handling 
him like glass, so to see someone handle him more freely and confidently 
helped us realize he’s stronger than we think, and we have more freedom 
in how we hold him too. She’s also taught us new ways to hold him, and 
burp him, that have brought us a lot of success compared to the standard 
techniques we were shown in the hospital. She’s also given us ways to 
help strengthen his tongue function, like tracing our finger around his 
gums, and sweeping around on his soft palate and pushing down on his tongue.

Connecting with Katie has also been wonderful; we wouldn’t have even 
been aware such services existed if we hadn’t met her by chance at our 
first appointment with Elizabeth. In the same way, Katie handles the 
baby so confidently and effortlessly that we’re reminded we can handle 
him more freely too. And many of the exercises she has done with him are 
things we’ve been able to replicate at home as well (some different 
stretches, nothing with his skull, haha). He enjoys all the new touches!

Perhaps we’re just particularly hungry for confident 
familial energy to help guide us through this time and both Elizabeth 
and Katie have that kind of warmth and positivity. We’ll be sad when 
Emmery stops breastfeeding and we no longer have an excuse to go
.”

WE couldn’t ask for a better overview that touches on some (still not all) aspects of lactation support as practiced at Lactation Care with Elizabeth. A wholistic, family approach includes much more than a latch. And seeking help from an IBCLC affords expert advice on many aspects of lactation, feeding, structure and development.

Within the safe space of lactation support, processing and healing occur, both mental and physical. We are thankful for other professionals we include in our care for clients and love to hear about the progress made outside of our office. Thanks to our client for the kind words and personal examples of her experience with breastfeeding support!

Look what is new!

We have the joy of doing what we love here at Lactation Care with Elizabeth. And we found others that love it too! Over the past several months, as many of you already know, we have added to our team. We love our clients and want to be available as needed. More clients, clients having babies, babies having procedures, life changes, and so forth meant adding fantastic IBCLCs to the rotation so we really can meet you where you are on your breastfeeding journey.

We want you to meet the new members of the team and get to know them. At Lactation Care with Elizabeth, we love getting to know our clients – both parents and baby – and seeing into such an important part of your lives. Read more about the ladies on our website: http://www.lactationcarewithelizabeth.com/about.

What is an IBCLC?

What is an IBCLC? How are IBCLCs different from other Lactation Consultants?

IBCLC stands for International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. This is the gold standard for lactation consultants. To acquire this certification, I spent a lot of time (1000 hours) working under experienced IBCLCs, took 75 hours of courses in human lactation, and then studied for and passed the IBCLC exam. I initially took and passed the exam in 2011. Every five years, an IBCLC has to recertify; I recertified in 2016 with 75 hours of continuing lactation education.

What makes an IBCLC different from other lactation consultants? A Certified Lactation Counselor, or CLC, has taken a short (usually 40 hours) class and passed a written test; there is no required hands on component. Don’t misunderstand: there are many experienced Lactation Counselors out there who can offer valuable assistance! But do ask what kind of experience the person you are seeing has. You want someone helping you who has both book knowledge and supervised hands on experience.

I was a CLC on my journey to becoming an IBCLC. I currently have more than 16 years of experience caring for breastfeeding mothers, along with my certifications. I would love to work with you and your baby to help you reach your breastfeeding goals.

 

Find out more about how to become an IBCLC from IBLCE.